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Arab Research Support Programme II

In December 2011, ARI launched the Arab Research Support Programme (ARSP), which aimed to promote through financial grants quality research in Arab countries in order to guide policy debates and empower individuals and new institutions. Renewed for a second round (2014-2016), ARSP has expanded in scope. In addition to offering funds for scholars from the region, ARSP II also provides guidance for current students and new graduates through a mentor programme and a week-long training session on theory and methods. The programme hosts an online platform for academic debate between participants and mentors, and has produced an e-curriculum providing annotated bibliographies related to a variety of subfields in the social sciences.

The ARSP II supports 56 scholars from across the Arab world and gives priority to innovative, evidence-based research related to the democratic transitions in the region. The main themes covered in the programme are:

  • Institutional reform of state agencies in the Arab region
  • The new women’s mobilisation and processes of national and regional diffusion
  • The processes and actors of the democratic transition
  • Security in the context of transition and conflict
  • Social movements and demands, and contentious politics in the region

Dina El Khawaga, ARI Programme Director, leads this project assisted by Nafissa El Souri, ARI Programme and Research Assistant. 

Project Publications
Student activism in post-2011 Egypt: understanding a contentious arena in a fluctuating context
Student activism in post-2011 Egypt: understanding a contentious arena in a fluctuating context
Research focusing on non-formal political and social stakeholders/activists has been generally side-lined as a subject of political, sociological, and economic studies in the Arab world. This has been the case since the emergence of these sub-fields in the post-independence period of the 1960s, as Arab universities and research centres were founding their academic fields, until today. The exception that confirmed the rule was the Marxist approaches that succeeded in fostering a small but steady number of research groups interested mainly in workers’ and labor movements, and in particular unions, or in rural sociology as a reflection of the expression of class struggle within Arab societies.
Farah Ramzy
Social Movements and Mechanisms of Mass Organisation and Protest
Social Movements and Mechanisms of Mass Organisation and Protest
Research focusing on non-formal political and social stakeholders/activists has been generally side-lined as a subject of political, sociological, and economic studies in the Arab world. This has been the case since the emergence of these sub-fields in the post-independence period of the 1960s, as Arab universities and research centres were founding their academic fields, until today. The exception that confirmed the rule was the Marxist approaches that succeeded in fostering a small but steady number of research groups interested mainly in workers’ and labor movements, and in particular unions, or in rural sociology as a reflection of the expression of class struggle within Arab societies.
Ahmed A. Hameed Hussien

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